Free Legal Information

The legal information you need.

Interest on business debts

If you are in business and are owed money by another business as a business debt you are entitled to interest on the debt and amount owed. The Late Payment of Commercial Debts Act 1998 (as amended by the Late Payment of Commercial Debts Regulations 2002) give you a...

Payment of Judgement Debts

When a case is lost, and you are ordered to pay a  judgment together most probably with legal costs, the usual order will usually be for payment within 14 days. But what if you do not have the money to pay the judgment debt and cannot pay? This will very often be the...

Vicarious Liability

Vicarious liability is where someone is held legally responsible for the acts or omissions of someone else. Therefore vicarious liability can make an employer strictly liable for the acts and failures of an employee if these took place in the course of their...

Cooling Off and the Distance Selling Regulations

If you buy something from a business online as a consumer, you will have the same Consumer Rights Act protection as if you had walked into a shop. You will however also have additional rights and a cooling off period under the Distance Selling Regulations (DSR). These...

Personal Injury Awards and Divorce

Accidents and injury caused by accidents and injury are traumatic and can be life changing. However our legal system will usually ensure that financial compensation is paid in a personal injury claim by way of damages when someone is injured in an accident that was...
Drafting a Statement of Claim

Drafting a Statement of Claim

Your Particulars (or Statement) of Claim is the document which sets out what you are claiming and gives details of why you say you are entitled to a judgment from the court. It is sometimes called the Statement of Claim or Points of Claim which are the same thing....

Housing Repair Claims

Housing Repair Claims

If you are a private tenant whose landlord has failed or is refusing to carry out necessary repairs to your home having been informed of the problem your first step should be complaining to your local council. They have a statutory duty to investigate cases of...

Delay in Inheritance Act Applications

Delay in Inheritance Act Applications

The Inheritance Act (or the Inheritance (Provision for Family and Dependents) Act 1975, to give it its full title) was passed to help spouses, children, civil partners, cohabitees and other surviving dependents who have been left to cope without sufficient money to...

Should you go for a DIY Divorce

DIY Divorce How practical is a DIY Divorce? Would money saved now by doing your own divorce cost you heavily later on? For most people the answer is that a Do It Yourself Divorce is quite possible especially if: • You and your spouse have agreed everything. This will...

Occupation Orders Where There Is No Violence

Occupation Orders You are divorcing, still living under the same roof and the situation is impossible. Things seem to be taking forever and you just can’t go on like this. The atmosphere in the house is terrible and the children are beginning to suffer. You need space...

Divorce and the Second Wife (or Husband)

So is there life after divorce? The answer is yes, but for many this can be affected by on-going financial obligations from an earlier marriage. Statistics show that remarriage is usual and that thoughts of 'once bitten, twice shy' do not last. What will be the...

Hidden Assets and Divorce

Full disclosure of all matrimonial assets by both parties is a basic principle of divorce. It has to be known what is in the pot before it can be divided up. Notwithstanding this it is very far from unknown for a spouse to hide some of his or her assets and by not...

Restraining Orders. The Facts.

Restraining orders are injunction orders made by a criminal court-usually a magistrate court-to protect the victim of criminal behavior by forbidding the perpetrator from continuing their course of action. A restraining order can be for any length of time or even run...

Co-respondent to a divorce petition?

Co-Respondent If you have been named as a co-respondent in a divorce petition brought by someone's spouse you will need to decide what to do. Obviously you are being partly blamed for the breakdown of a marriage. They are angry and some of that anger is being directed...

read more

Divorce mistakes

Things can go wrong with a divorce through mistakes even where it seems there is agreement that the marriage is over and there is no dispute over who gets what. There are a number of mistakes which are commonly made which can lead to problems.  We signpost them here....

read more

Dealing with CAFCASS

CAFCASS reports A judge who has asked CAFCASS to prepare a report advising the court on what is in a child’s best interest is going to be heavily influenced by the report which the CAFCASS officer prepares. They are not bound to follow a CAFCASS recommendation but...

read more

Business Law

How to prepare a witness statement

Witness statements contain the evidence in support of your case. As such your witness statement is critical and winning or losing might well turn on how witness statements are prepared. If something you wish to put before the court is not in a witness statement it...

Acceptance of contracts

For a contract to be legally binding there must be clear acceptance of the contract and an intention to be legally bound. The three elements of a valid contract-offer, acceptance and consideration -must be present. Unless it is shown that there was an acceptance of an...

Interest on business debts

If you are in business and are owed money by another business as a business debt you are entitled to interest on the debt and amount owed. The Late Payment of Commercial Debts Act 1998 (as amended by the Late Payment of Commercial Debts Regulations 2002) give you a...

Misrepresentation and the Misrepresentation Act 1967

A misrepresentation is an untrue statement of fact made by one party to the other, which induces and misleads that party to enter into a contract. Misrepresentation must be of fact, not of opinion or intention. Silence in itself can be regarded as a misrepresentation....

Is time of the essence?

When you enter into an agreement with someone to do some work for you the time to complete that work will not be 'of the essence' unless this is specified. The work must just be carried out within a reasonable time and what is a reasonable time can be open to...
Does an employment contract have to be in writing?

Does an employment contract have to be in writing?

An employment contract is no different from any other contract in that most do not have to be in writing to be legally valid and enforceable. If you are offered employment, accept and then start work a valid contract has been created between you and your employer even...

Interest on business debts

Interest on business debts

If you are in business and are owed money by another business as a business debt you are entitled to interest on the debt and amount owed. The Late Payment of Commercial Debts Act 1998 (as amended by the Late Payment of Commercial Debts Regulations 2002) give you a...

How to Avoid (or at Least Delay) Repossession

How to Avoid (or at Least Delay) Repossession

If you are facing repossession, realistically assess whether you are able to keep your home. When you have missed some mortgage payments, or you think you will soon, it’s time to face what’s probably the tough question: can you afford to keep your house? Apart from...

Employment Law

Employed or Self-Employed?

The legal rights of the employed and the self-employed are very different. It is only employees who can bring claims for unfair dismissal, claim redundancy payments and have the protection of the various Employment Acts. Self-employed people have none of these rights....

Employment References – When Are Employers Liable?

An employee may need a reference from an old employer to help secure future employment or may require a reference for personal matters, such as to provide to a landlord or for a mortgage application. An employer is not obliged to provide you with a reference when you...

Blowing the Whistle

If you believe there is malpractice or wrongdoing in your workplace, then you can ‘blow the whistle’ on the behaviour and be protected from losing your job and/or being victimised by your employer. The Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998 legislates that if you believe...

Third-Party Dismissals

What happens if you are an employer and a third-party demands that you dismiss one of your employees? This situation may well arise if you are supplying workers under a service contract and are told by your customer that you will lose the contract unless you remove...

Stress at Work

Work can be stressful, but sometimes it is unduly so. Where a workload and demands placed by an employer on an employee are excessive, there is a duty upon that employer to take action to remedy the situation. If they do not do so, the employee may be entitled to...

Lies, White Lies and Your CV

In a competitive jobs market, people tend to think ‘does a little white lie in my CV matter if it helps me get the job?’. The answer to this is that it very well could, and the consequences could very well be serious. Your CV may well be a critical document when the...

read more

Health and Safety at Work

The law imposes a responsibility on an employer to ensure the health and safety at work for all their employees. Much of the law regarding safety in the work place can be found in the Health & Safety At Work Act 1974. Employers have to take reasonable steps to...

read more

Employment References – When Are Employers Liable?

An employee may need a reference from an old employer to help secure future employment or may require a reference for personal matters, such as to provide to a landlord or for a mortgage application. An employer is not obliged to provide you with a reference when you...

read more

Property Law

Property Law Covenants

Property covenants are promises that come with a property and by bind the present owner of the property . The most common types of covenants are restrictive covenants. A restrictive covenant is a promise attaching land which binds the owner for the time being and...

Rights of Ways and Easements

An easement is a right to use another person’s property for a stated purpose. A type of easement can be a right of way that someone has over another person’s property. There are 4 main types of easements that are recognised rights: Rights of way Easements of support...

Public Landlords and Council Tenants

A public landlord will include local authorities, district councils and most housing associations. A council tenant will be a person who takes a tenancy from any of these. There are two main types of council tenancy: secure and introductory. Where a tenancy agreement...

Obtaining Possession of Rented Property

A landlord wishing to recover possession of his property must follow the correct legal procedure. If he attempts to evict a tenant otherwise, he may be guilty of a criminal offence and could be ordered to pay substantial damages. Most private sector tenancies will be...

How to Avoid (or at Least Delay) Repossession

If you are facing repossession, realistically assess whether you are able to keep your home. When you have missed some mortgage payments, or you think you will soon, it’s time to face what’s probably the tough question: can you afford to keep your house? Apart from...
Property Law Covenants

Property Law Covenants

Property covenants are promises that come with a property and by bind the present owner of the property . The most common types of covenants are restrictive covenants. A restrictive covenant is a promise attaching land which binds the owner for the time being and...

Acceptance of contracts

Acceptance of contracts

For a contract to be legally binding there must be clear acceptance of the contract and an intention to be legally bound. The three elements of a valid contract-offer, acceptance and consideration -must be present. Unless it is shown that there was an acceptance of an...

Public Landlords and Council Tenants

Public Landlords and Council Tenants

A public landlord will include local authorities, district councils and most housing associations. A council tenant will be a person who takes a tenancy from any of these. There are two main types of council tenancy: secure and introductory. Where a tenancy agreement...

Inheritance Law

Lasting Powers of Attorney

A Lasting Power Of Attorney unlike a general power remains effective even if the donor loses his or her mental capacity. There are two types and separate LPAs can be granted by a donor to deal with each of his financial and his personal affairs. Unlike its...

Appointing a Guardian

Parents with young children should always consider who will look after their children if they are unable to do so themselves and appoint a Guardian for their children to ensure that they are looked after by a suitable person in the event of their death or serious...

Who Can Decide Where You End Up?

Most people when making their will include a statement of their wishes as to what they would like to be done with their 'mortal remains'. They might say that they wish to be buried, cremated, or even sometimes buried at sea or to have their ashes scattered at a...

I’m dying and when I’m gone everything is yours

To pass on your estate when you die you must make a Will which must be properly executed. It has to be written, dated and signed in the presence of witnesses. The Law is quite clear in that. Sometimes however a person facing imminent death may not have made a Will or...

Matrimonial Claims and Inheritance

What happens with money or property which has been inherited by one of the parties when they divorce can give rise to uncertainty and very often bad feeling. Will it be matrimonial property falling into the part for division? The answer is that there are no clearly...

When to Change Your Will

It's time to write a new will if you're experiencing a big change in your life, such as moving, getting married or divorced, moving in with a new partner, or bringing a new baby into the family. Your will should be tailored to your current family and financial...

read more

Unclaimed Assets

At a conservative estimate, there is around £15 billion of assets left in the estates of deceased people which remains unclaimed. There may be a number of reasons for this and why it has not been possible for money to be paid to those entitled under a Will. Amongst...

read more

Loss of a Partner. Who Can Claim?

Nasty shocks can be in store for cohabitees when one of the partners dies without making a will. The late partner’s estate will not automatically pass to them in the absence of a will made in favour of the survivor. The rules of intestacy will be applied, which will...

read more