Vicarious Liability

Vicarious liability is where someone is held legally responsible for the acts or omissions of someone else. Therefore vicarious liability can make an employer strictly liable for the acts and failures of an employee if these took place in the course of their...

Does an employment contract have to be in writing?

An employment contract is no different from any other contract in that most do not have to be in writing to be legally valid and enforceable. If you are offered employment, accept and then start work a valid contract has been created between you and your employer even...

TUPE and the Transfer of Undertakings

TUPE is shorthand for the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations 2006. What this act does is protect employee’s rights when the business they work for is sold or transferred to a new owner. Employees of the business, when the firm changes...

Third-Party Dismissals

What happens if you are an employer and a third-party demands that you dismiss one of your employees? This situation may well arise if you are supplying workers under a service contract and are told by your customer that you will lose the contract unless you remove...

Stress at Work

Work can be stressful, but sometimes it is unduly so. Where a workload and demands placed by an employer on an employee are excessive, there is a duty upon that employer to take action to remedy the situation. If they do not do so, the employee may be entitled to...

Lies, White Lies and Your CV

In a competitive jobs market, people tend to think ‘does a little white lie in my CV matter if it helps me get the job?’. The answer to this is that it very well could, and the consequences could very well be serious. Your CV may well be a critical document when the...